Selkirk College Builds Momentum for 50th Anniversary Celebration

TMTVNEWS.COM, CASTLEGAR BC CANADA – With the arrival of 2016, Selkirk College is preparing for a year-long golden anniversary celebration that will dive into the past, embrace the present and look towards the future.

PHOTO: Bob Hall - Members of the Selkirk College 50th Anniversary Committee stand in front of the Castlegar Campus with a new logo that recognizes five decades of post-secondary in the West Kootenay-Boundary. The logo and tagline “Journeys Taken, Futures Waiting” will be used to promote the various events and projects that will be taking place in the region over the next 16 months.
PHOTO: Bob Hall – Members of the Selkirk College 50th Anniversary Committee stand in front of the Castlegar Campus with a new logo that recognizes five decades of post-secondary in the West Kootenay-Boundary. The logo and tagline “Journeys Taken, Futures Waiting” will be used to promote the various events and projects that will be taking place in the region over the next 16 months.

Fifty years ago, a new chapter in learning began for the West Kootenay-Boundary. With enthusiastic support from residents across the region who desired access to post-secondary education close to home, Selkirk College opened its doors in September, 1966.

Five decades later, British Columbia’s first regional rural college continues its mission to inspire lifelong learning, transform lives through education and training, and serve the communities who backed it from the start.

“It’s been an incredible journey to this point,” says Selkirk College President Angus Graeme. “When you think about all the lives and families that have been impacted over the last 50 years because community leaders and forward thinkers in the early 1960s had the vision to make Selkirk College a reality. We are humbled every day to be able to continue this important work for the people of our region and looking forward to celebrating this anniversary with all of the communities we serve.”

The push to establish a regional college in the West Kootenay-Boundary began in 1962 and was rewarded in February, 1965 when 72 per cent of electors in the region voted in favour of establishing a college in a referendum. At the time of the referendum, the regional college incorporated six districts that included Trail, Nelson, Castlegar, Slocan, Grand Forks and Arrow Lakes.

Selkirk College opened its doors in September, 1966 with 458 charter students taking classes in the old bunkhouses at the Celgar Pulp Mill as construction of the Castlegar Campus concluded that first fall. The campus was completed and officially welcomed students in January, 1967.

“Selkirk College has a rich history and that will be an important part of our 50th celebrations,” says Graeme, who began teaching at the college in 1992 and now serves as Selkirk’s eighth president. “But what we have planned goes beyond simply marking a date on the calendar, it’s a time to celebrate what we are today and what we will continue to be into the future.”

The Selkirk College 50th Anniversary Committee has been working for several months on plans that will build excitement for the historical milestone. Starting with the kick-off at the annual Bursary Tea on January 30 at Mary Hall on the Tenth Street Campus in Nelson, there will be several events and projects that take shape over the next 16 months.

The main event is the Homecoming Weekend Celebration set for September 16 to 18 which will bring together current staff and students with alumni, retirees and community supporters. In April, 2017 the Class of 2017 will be recognized as the 50th Selkirk College grad class to march across the stage and into their futures.

Stories from the last 50 years will be told over the course of the next 16 months, culminating with a commemorative coffee table book that traces the highlights of the last five decades. Funds will also be raised throughout the year to establish a $50,000 scholarship/bursary which will provide a legacy of financial support for future students.

“This is an exciting time to reinforce to our communities the importance of post-secondary education close to home,” says Maggie Keczan, Selkirk College’s Marketing Manager. “The Homecoming Weekend Celebration is the big event, but there will be plenty more opportunities in the next 16 months for community members to get involved in helping mark and celebrate this important occasion.”

Find out more about the Selkirk College 50th Anniversary Celebration at selkirk.ca/50-years.

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Parks Canada might privatize mountain hot springs

Workers at three mountain hot springs remain in limbo four years after Parks Canada announced it wanted to privatize the tourist attractions in Alberta and B.C.

Parks would still own the facilities but would contract out the business operations at the Banff, Radium and Miette Hot Springs in Jasper.
Parks would still own the facilities but would contract out the business operations at the Banff, Radium and Miette Hot Springs in Jasper.

The 2012 decision by Parks Canada put employees at the three sites in a perilous employment situation as they have a notification of affected status, which means the operations of the hot springs could face commercialization in the future.

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5 astronomical events you don’t want to miss this winter

Sure it’s cold, and we often have to battle the overcast sky in winter, but if you get some clear nights, here are a few jewels to catch this season.

The year starts off with a comet in our night sky.

Comet C/2013 US10 (Catalina) was discovered on Oct. 31, 2013. It’s made its way around the sun and is now approaching Earth. It will make its closet flyby on Jan. 17 at a distance of 110 million km.

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UPDATE – 16 YEAR-OLD MISSING FROM WINLAW BC LOCATED

UPDATE: 5PM JANUARY 10, 2016 – QUINLAN KRUSE HAS BEEN LOCATED AND IS SAFE.

TMTVNEWS.COM, WINLAW BC, CANADA – (RCMP). The Slocan Lake RCMP are requesting the public’s assistance in locating a missing 16 year old male. Quinlan KRUSE was reported missing on Friday January 8th, 2016 from his residence in Winlaw BC, it was confirmed he boarded public transit and got off at the MTI stop in Castlegar BC later that morning. KRUSE is believed to be somewhere in the Kootenay area.

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COMMUNITIES GET MORE FUNDS FOR POPULAR GRANTING PROGRAMS

COMMUNITIES GET MORE FUNDS FOR POPULAR GRANTING PROGRAMS

Columbia Basin Trust commits 15 per cent increase to support local projects

TMTVNEWS.COM, (Columbia Basin) – Community projects will be getting access to more funds this spring through Columbia Basin Trust’s popular Community Initiatives and Affected Areas programs. The Trust announced a 15 per cent increase from $3.6 million per year throughout the Basin, to over $4.2 million per year for each of the next five years.

“We are pleased to continue our long-standing partnership with local governments and First Nations to identify local priorities and deliver benefits to Basin communities,” said Neil Muth, President and CEO. “The ultimate goal is to support the projects that are important to residents, and we know this increase will help communities do more.”

Started in 1998, these programs are the Trust’s longest running granting programs designed to help address the needs of Basin communities. The Trust distributes funds to local government and First Nation partners once a year, and communities then use various methods—from local council decisions to votes from residents—to decide which projects will receive grants.

MacKenzie Avenue... Nickname(s): Revy, The Stoke, Revelstuck Motto: Work Hard, Play Hard
MacKenzie Avenue…
Nickname(s): Revy, The Stoke, Revelstuck
Motto: Work Hard, Play Hard

“We are very pleased that CBT has decided to increase the funding for this program,” said Revelstoke Mayor Mark McKee. “Over the past 18 years, the program has provided significant support for many community projects that could not have proceeded without the funds provided by the Trust, and these projects have really benefitted our residents and improved their quality of life in many ways.”

“From Better Babies to seniors programs, educational initiatives, environmental projects and community hall renovations, the Community Initiatives and Affected Areas Programs have provided critical support to a broad range of projects that have directly benefited the residents in our communities,” says RDEK Board Chair Rob Gay. “Every year we are over-subscribed, and the increase in funding is fantastic news as it will allow even more people to benefit from these valuable programs.”

The new five-year commitment totals over $21 million and extends to 2021.

To learn more about the programs and view upcoming deadlines visit cbt.org/cipaap.

Columbia Basin Trust supports the ideas and efforts of the people in the Columbia Basin. To learn more about the Trust’s programs and initiatives, and how it helps deliver social, economic and environmental benefits to the Basin, visit cbt.org or call 1.800.505.8998.

Community Initiatives and Affected Areas Programs: Annual Funding 2016/17–2020/21

All areas receive Community Initiatives funding, while the communities and areas around the Arrow, Kinbasket, Duncan and Koocanusa reservoirs which were most affected by the construction of the Treaty dams, also receive Affected Areas funding.

Local Government Annual Funding
City of Revelstoke $404,269
Ktunaxa Nation Council (four bands) $144,900
Shuswap Band $36,225
Regional District of Central Kootenay $1,486,213
Regional District of East Kootenay $1,197,531
Regional District of Kootenay Boundary $354,973
Town of Golden $325,562
Village of Valemount $261,950

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Buying local boosts B.C. bee industry in 2015

TMTVNEWS.COM – (BC GOV) – 2015 was a successful year for the beekeeping industry in British Columbia, with more and more people buying honey direct from beekeepers, bringing the estimated total farm receipts of the year to more than $25 million.

British Columbians preferred to buy their honey straight from beekeepers in 2015, with estimated farm receipts for the retail sales of honey in B.C. almost doubling from 2014, to almost $16.5 million. Retail sales include farmers’ markets, roadside stands, and direct sales to consumers and restaurants. Beekeepers’ farm cash receipts from honey sold to stores and wholesale packers topped $3 million in 2015 in comparison.

The sales from beeswax also increased to reach over $1 million in 2015. Beeswax is used to make candles, and is increasingly being used in the production of food, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals.

Beekeeper’s pollination income for 2015 brought in an estimated $5 million with honey bees used to pollinate B.C.’s fruit, berry, and canola farms. Crop pollination contributes an estimated $250 million to the economy in B.C. and more than $2 billion in Canada. The beekeeping statistics were collected through Ministry of Agriculture beekeeper surveys.

The province is home to more than 2,400 beekeepers and almost 45,000 colonies of bees. Beekeeping is celebrated on May 29 each year. The day was declared Day of the Honey Bee to remind British Columbians of the significant role bees and beekeepers play every day and to recognize the vital importance of bees in modern agriculture and the environment.

Quote:

Minister of Agriculture Norm Letnick –

“The beekeeping industry is playing a major role in the province’s economy. These statistics show that more and more British Columbians are choosing to buy their honey direct from beekeepers, and showing a strong interest in buying local foods. Supporting local food producers creates local jobs and revenue, and is a sweet reward to the province’s beekeepers.”

Learn more:

More information about bees, apiculture and support services offered to British Columbian beekeepers: http://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/industry/agriculture-seafood/animals-and-crops/animal-production/bees

Kootenay Bee News - Spreading the word about bees - Photo Kootenay Bees News
Kootenay Bee News – Spreading the word about bees – Photo Kootenay Bees News

LOCAL KOOTENAY BEES NEWS

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HONOURARY LIFETIME HCBC MEMBERSHIPS AWARDED

TMTVNEWS.COM – Dorothy Kirby from Nanaimo, BC and George Bloor from Trail, BC were awarded with Honourary Lifetime HCBC Memberships in December 2015.

There are few who have worked for as long and with as much passion for the vocation of teaching as Dorothy Kirby has. As a coach, Pony Club examiner, and tireless volunteer at the provincial and national levels, Dorothy has always believed in the importance of good coaching. She has spent decades advocating for programs like Pony Club and the Canadian coaching system. Dorothy continues to coach a few lucky students, and while her schedule may be a little less hectic, her commitment to good horsemanship and to the organizations she has helped to mold remains as strong as ever.

George Bloor was a pioneer in the BC horse industry and is still involved with horses today in the interior of BC. He is a mentor to many BC riders and trainers and an all around great horseman. While presenting George with the award we learned that his original HCBC Membership number was in fact 1. George was HCBC’s very first member 36 years ago when HCBC got it’s start (with George’s help of course!).

The Honourary Lifetime Membership Award is not something HCBC gives out on a regular basis. In fact, only five other people have ever been awarded with the same honours throughout the whole of HCBC’s history. Dorothy and George join the ranks of Bill Archibald, June Lalonde, Alf Fletcher, Danny Bland and Sherman Olson.

An Honourary Lifetime HCBC Membership may be granted by the HCBC Board of Directors, at their discretion, to any HCBC member who has demonstrated exceptionally outstanding service to HCBC and the BC equine community. The nomination criteria is tough and requires a majority vote (minimum 75%) of the HCBC Board of Directors present at a meeting to grant it. Any individual or club/affiliate of HCBC is entitled to nominate a candidate for “Honourary Lifetime Membership” at any time throughout the year. The award consists of a lifetime regular membership to HCBC. Nominations must be made in writing and sent to administration@hcbc.ca.

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Cranbrook clock tower parts in good hands with history society

Volunteer says clock parts have a lot of history in a town that hasn’t preserved history well

CBC – The Cranbrook History Centre is thrilled about the latest addition to their collection: the gears from the clock in downtown Cranbrook.

According to volunteer Dave Humphrey, the clock parts have quite a bit of history behind them.

He says the clock tower, built between 1911 and 1912, was originally part of a post office, which was demolished in 1971. The city was offered the building for use as a library, which it declined.

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Drone registration on its way – Transport Canada

What goes up, must come down and it appears that Transport Canada is ready to come down on drones. Canadian regulators are expected to follow the path of their American counterparts by making it mandatory for drone owners to register their flying toys. And as Kelly Hayes reports, if your drone does come crashing down, your insurance company may not be much help.

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Think safety first

DON'T FLY Closer than 9 km from any airport, heliport, or aerodrome.
DON’T FLY Closer than 9 km from any airport, heliport, or aerodrome.

More and more people are flying drones for the fun of flying. Transport Canada regulates their use to keep the public and our airspace safe.

Before you take to the skies, make sure you understand the risks and learn how to avoid them.

If your aircraft weighs more than 35 kg, you must apply for a Special Flight Operations Certificate.

If your aircraft weighs 35 kg or less and is used for the fun of flying only, you don’t need permission from Transport Canada. You must follow the law and fly safely – read our safety guidelines.

DON'T FLY --- Higher than 90 metres above the ground. Closer than 150 metres from people, animals, buildings, structures, or vehicles. In populated areas or near large groups of people, including sporting events, concerts, festivals, and firework shows. Near moving vehicles, highways, bridges, busy streets or anywhere you could endanger or distract drivers.
DON’T FLY — Higher than 90 metres above the ground. Closer than 150 metres from people, animals, buildings, structures, or vehicles. In populated areas or near large groups of people, including sporting events, concerts, festivals, and firework shows. Near moving vehicles, highways, bridges, busy streets or anywhere you could endanger or distract drivers.

Fly your drone legally

You are responsible to fly your drone safely and legally. In Canada, you must:

  • Follow the rules in the Canadian Aviation Regulations
  • Respect the Criminal Code, Trespass Act, as well as all municipal, provincial, and territorial laws regarding trespassing and privacy.
  • If you put aircraft at risk, fly where you are not allowed to, or endanger anyone’s safety, you could face serious consequences, including fines and jail time.

Fly your drone safely

Transport Canada recommends you follow the basic Do’s and Don’ts for flying your drone safely and legally. Not doing so can put lives, aircraft, and property at risk.

Do Don’t fly
  • Fly your drone during daylight and in good weather (not in clouds or fog).
  • Keep your drone in sight, where you can see it with your own eyes – not only through an on-board camera, monitor or smartphone.
  • Make sure your drone is safe for flight before take-off. Ask yourself, for example, are the batteries fully charged? Is it too cold to fly?
  • Know if you need to apply for a Special Flight Operations Certificate
  • Respect the privacy of others – avoid flying over private property or taking photos or videos without permission.
  • Closer than 9 km from any airport, heliport, or aerodrome.
  • Higher than 90 metres above the ground.
  • Closer than 150 metres from people, animals, buildings, structures, or vehicles.
  • In populated areas or near large groups of people, including sporting events, concerts, festivals, and firework shows.
  • Near moving vehicles, highways, bridges, busy streets or anywhere you could endanger or distract drivers.
  • Within restricted and controlled airspace, including near or over military bases, prisons, and forest fires.
  • Anywhere you may interfere with first responders.

Download the Do’s and Don’ts for flying your drone safely and legally (PDF)

Frequently Asked Questions

What laws apply to drones?
How does Transport Canada enforce the regulations?
Does Transport Canada plan to review the current regulations for drones?
Why are there so many different terms for “drones”?
Can I fly in a national park?
Can I fly my unmanned aircraft outside of Canada?
Should model aircraft associations comply with the safety guidelines?
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